Helping Stroke Victims

A stroke will drastically change the life of anyone who is a victim of one.  Stroke victims often find themselves dealing with some very serious long-term conditions:

  • Paralysis
  • Impaired speech
  • Loss of the use of extremities
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Depression
  • Increased risk for successive strokes

Causes of a Stroke

A stroke is caused by a disruption in the blood flow to the brain. The two most common types of strokes are ischemic strokes, which result when the blood flow to the brain is blocked by a blood clot, and hemorrhagic strokes, which result from a burst blood vessel in the brain. On many occasions, these major strokes are preceded by a small stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Some of the key symptoms of a TIA include:

  • transient slurred speech
  • transient weakness in the face or extremities
  • brief episodes of confusion
  • transient visual disturbances

Many people have these mini-strokes, these temporary losses of function that can be a warning sign of an impending major stroke.  Early recognition and treatment of a small stroke or TIA can prevent a major stroke.

Strokes and Medical Malpractice

When physicians fail to recognize and treat the symptoms of a TIA, and the patient suffers a devastating stroke they may have committed medical malpractice. However, medical malpractice in this area is not just confined to the failure to diagnose a stroke. It also encompasses the failure to properly treat or prevent a stroke. For example, Coumadin, a blood thinning agent used by physicians to prevent blood clots, can actually result in severe brain hemorrhaging if improperly administered to a hemorrhagic stroke victim. Conversely, a patient may suffer an ischemic stroke if a physician fails to prescribe Coumadin or a similar medication to prevent blood clots from forming in certain situations.