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CDC reports decline in number of C-sections performed in U.S.

For an expectant mother, a vaginal delivery is typically expected and preferred. There are, however, cases where the health and very lives of mother and child are at risk. When these types of labor and delivery emergencies occur, doctors and nurses must often act to deliver a baby as quickly as possible which typically means performing a cesarean section.

While C-sections are necessary in some deliveries, large percentages are deemed unnecessary. A C-section is considered a major surgery and as such carries with it many of the same risks associated with other types of surgeries including infection, hemorrhage and the development or migration of blood clots.

Despite the risks associated with C-sections, many doctors prefer this type of delivery over a vaginal delivery. Vaginal deliveries are less predictable and often require a doctor’s time and attention for hours or even days. Doctors, therefore, often prefer the predictability of a scheduled C-section and may be quick to recommend this plan of action to a laboring mother.

Despite the inconvenience and unpredictability, a vaginal birth is much safer for both mother and baby and many within the health care profession are calling upon doctors to encourage vaginal births when possible. The U.S. Center for Disease and Prevention recently released data that shows a 2 percent decline in the number of C-section births for first time mothers from 2009 to 2012. The decline in the U.S. C-section rate is encouraging and is expected to become apparent in the coming years.

Mothers, fathers and children who have been adversely impacted by a medical error that occurred during a C-section may choose to take legal action. In cases where a mother or baby suffered injuries, a medical malpractice lawsuit can aid in both the discovery of key evidence and recovering of compensation.

Source: KTBC-TV, “First-time cesarean rates dipped in 2012,” Steven Reinberg, Jan. 23, 2014


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